A Eulogy.

Life has always had one constant unavoidable feature of it: it will always come to an end. The brutality of death has never been anything the living can get used to. We arrive, we live, we learn, we love, we lose, we conquer, we fight, and then we must leave. He was a good lad. …

Continue reading A Eulogy.

Advertisements

Paidamoyo

I hate cats. Absolutely. The mere sight of one sends chills down my spine. But it wasn't always like this. One stormy evening, our maid, Paradzai was just about to lock up the storeroom at the back of the house when the creature scampered in, drenched in rain and visibly freezing from the horrible weather …

Continue reading Paidamoyo

21 Questions with MaKupsy

MAKUPSY

Hello everyone, it’s been a beautiful day so far.  I hope you are looking forward to the weekend as much as I am. A few minutes ago I got an email from a fellow blogger Kudzai and I didn’t realise it was blog related.  I thought I had nothing to write about today and he magically came through for me.  He has hit me up with 21 Questions and trust me he is not ready for the come back I have for him!  Let me get to answering him as honestly and and as quickly as I can, my body is here but my mind is already out there celebrating the end of the working week!

  • A few people know your name, and also want to know the inspiration behind your blog name. Would you shed some light on that?

My name is Zvie.  My blog name derives from two…

View original post 1,842 more words

Day to Day Zimbabwe – Chapter 1: Matemai.

The Lens Blur.

His alarm chimes and he slowly pulls himself up. 5am. His wife takes a deep breath but doesn’t wake up from her slumber. She’s still tired from yesterday’s work. Matemai, as he is affectionately known, gets off the bed and steps over his two children lying in the reed mat on the floor. Searching on the small pile of clothes on the floor, he picks out his clothes for the day. The driver will be by the road in 15 minutes. He washes his face on the sink outside and puts his towel on the line to dry. Mai Megan will take it in once it is sufficiently dry. At 5:30 on the dot, the kombi he works with pulls up and he takes up his position at the door. Matemai is a mini-bus conductor. Elder, the driver, and Matemai mumble their greetings to each other. It’s too early for…

View original post 1,043 more words

The Other Side of the Street.

The Lens Blur.

It was a busy evening that day. The sun had just gone down, and the sky had taken a dark blue shade, slowly dimming into the blackness of night. The cars in the streets all had their lights on and as he brought his head down from looking up to the sky, the noisy bustle of the city returned to his ears:  the car horns, occasional screech of tyres, people talking and laughing, this guy buying airtime, that one on his phone, the guys by the corner kept arguing – he heard Hazard and Neymar – football debate. He walked past. The vastness of the city dawned on him then, just as it did often. Harare was huge, the buildings enormous, compared to his average stature. The dealings that happened behind closed doors massive; and he could tell he was just another pawn in the chess field, an expendable, not…

View original post 1,010 more words